Nature at its finest!

We’ve seen the start of a breeding season of the Spotted Eagle Owl, our cheetah on the reserve still eludes its persistent predators, the constantly beautiful landscapes, breath-taking indigenous flora and fauna and so much more. As we take it all in, we hope you enjoy our share of the month’s most unforgettable pictures.

Share your thoughts on any of our social platforms below. You can also visit our Trip Advisor page and tell us all about your stay.

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The Spotted Eagle Owl

The Spotted Eagle Owl


Survival of the Fittest

Survival of the Fittest


Wild & Free!

Wild & Free!


Buffalo Sun-Bathing

Buffalo Sun-Bathing


Roaring Lion

Roaring Lion


A member of our breeding elephant herd

A member of our breeding elephant herd

Survival of the “Chita”

Cheetah
“Cheetah,” derived from the Hindi word “Chita” means the spotted one. Ironically, while our reserve is home to an array of free roaming wildlife, there is unfortunately just one cheetah that remains on the reserve. He is a six year old male and despite being the only one, he does very well and survives using various methods.

On a recent afternoon game drive, one of our rangers witnessed our beloved cheetah have a close encounter with two hyenas – another efficient predator that threatens a cheetah’s survival rate. These hyenas were relentless and chased the cheetah down a steep trail. The swift hunter that he is, he eventually sought refuge in an abandoned warthog burrow and patiently waited for the hyenas to lose interest. As soon as the hyenas’ attention was diverted, he very nimbly made his escape. Being the fastest land mammal that can reach speeds of over 100 km/h ensured he’d eventually outrun his predators, no matter how persistent they were.

The next time you visit our lodge, be on the lookout for him.

Following our New Cubs!

Cubs exploring the reserve at Nambiti Hills
There was much excitement last year October when three new lion cubs were born on the reserve. Their mum moved them around to several den sites to keep them safe from any predators which limited our opportunity to spot them. We have since been following their progress and now that they are getting older, they bravely venture out to explore the reserve with their mum treating us to many sightings which make our game drives that much more exciting.

The male cub is a curious young lion and often comes close to the game viewer to investigate – giving our visitors a quick moment to take a photo. The two female cubs are sometimes shy and prefer to stay close to their mum.

We have also been tracking the paw prints of the two male brothers on the reserve who are of the same pride as these young cubs. They spend their days patrolling their territory which ranges from the waterfall in the north all the way to Nambiti Hills region in the south of the reserve – all within a single day.

They often stop to visit their mother and sibling cubs and on one afternoon we got to see the family together. We watched fascinated as they interacted with each other. The male cub became very excited with play fighting with his older brother who in turn made a point of putting him in his place. Afterwards, they made their way past our vehicles giving us a chance to take some pictures before they disappeared into a nearby gorge.

It’s always exciting watching this particular pride as they explore their new surroundings together.

Big brother & younger cub

Big brother & younger cub


Mum & her 3 cubs

Mum & her 3 cubs

Season of the Spotted Eagle Owl

Spotted Eagle Owl at Nambiti Hills

With February to July being breeding season, one of the most common visitors at our lodge is the Spotted Eagle Owl. Although being one of the smaller owls on the reserve, they are rather difficult to go unnoticed with wings that span over a metre wide.

During an evening game drive last week we happened to be at the right place, at the right time and spotted one claim its prey. In one clean swoop he stealthily grabbed a bird in-flight and immediately flew off into the distance taking the kill with him and leaving us in awe. Having great eyesight and the ability to rotate his head and neck up to 270 degrees gave him quite the advantage. It was quick and it was swift!

Spotted Eagle Owls are one of the most exciting creatures to watch on an evening game drive, and with an array of beautiful calls, a multitude of shapes and sizes and large gleaming eyes, our visitors and bird watchers alike have ample opportunity to view and photograph them conquering the night.

Unique Wildlife Viewing!

Close encounters with an African puff adder, unique game viewing, and Africa’s largest land mammal are amongst the pick of this month’s images from our lodge. Take a look at our incredible landscapes and vast wildlife as we feature a number of beautiful images for the month of April.

We would like you to share your photos with us by tagging them on any one of our social networks below. You can also visit our Trip Advisor page and tell us all about your stay.

Facebook: facebook.com/nambitihills
Twitter: twitter.com/nambitihills | @Nambiti Hills
Instagram: Instagram.com/NambitiHills
Trip Advisor: tripadvisor.com | Search: Nambiti Hills

An African sunset at Nambiti Hills

An African sunset at Nambiti Hills


A Redbilled Oxpecker cleans the coat of an Impala

A Redbilled Oxpecker cleans the coat of an Impala


An elephant welcome at Nambiti Hills

An elephant welcome at Nambiti Hills


The Greater Kudu at Nambiti Hills

The Greater Kudu at Nambiti Hills


An African Puff Adder

An African Puff Adder


Fangs of an African Puff Adder

Fangs of an African Puff Adder