It’s a tall order!

Zebra & Giraffe
As you reach Nambiti Hills, the first sign of wildlife you will encounter are zebras but as you make your way towards the lodge, it’s hard to miss the towering height and beautiful spotted coats of our giraffe herds. Often found in small groups of about half a dozen, they can be seen grazing on treetops (acacias being their favourite).

Their stature can sometimes be a disadvantage as it is difficult for them to drink at a water hole. To do so they need to spread their legs and bend down in an awkward position which often makes them vulnerable to predators. However, they aren’t entirely defenceless. The upside to having such long, strong legs is that one powerful kick, can not only kill a lion, but actually decapitate it.

Common amongst herds, are males fighting over females. Giraffe males (aka bulls) are no different and will use “necking” to defeat their opponent. They will battle one another by banging and twisting their long necks and heads, repeatedly, until the other gives in and walks away. These battles can get rather brutal and last for anything up to 20 minutes. Watching them from afar, their entwined heads almost take the form of a heart, which can be misleading because it’s actually quite the opposite.

Have you ever been lucky enough to have witnessed such a display and have managed to capture it on camera? If so, we would love for you share your photographs with us on our social circles. Let us be part of your adventures!

Facebook: facebook.com/nambitihills
Twitter: twitter.com/nambitihills | @Nambiti Hills
Instagram: Instagram.com/NambitiHills
Trip Advisor: tripadvisor.com | Search: Nambiti Hills

Herd of Giraffes

Herd of Giraffes


A giraffe grazing on a treetop

A giraffe grazing on a treetop

The Standoff!

Pied Crow vs African Fish Eagle
There is an abundance of birdlife at Nambiti Hills and the avid birdwatcher is sure to notice many rare species probing the reserve in search of food. But because most of our guests focus on trying to spot one of the big 5, they often forget to set their sights to the skies. And a lot happens up there!

While out on one of our afternoon game drives we were distracted by the distinctive screeching call of an African Fish Eagle. We slowed down only to notice it swoop down and victoriously snatch up a catfish in one fluid scoop.

The next thing we knew, the eagle was safely transporting its catch up to a secure tree top. He seemed rather proud of his catch. But not for long because a few seconds later a Pied Crow had put in motion a plan to steal the kill from the eagle. Clearly not intimidated by his size in comparison to the eagle, he took on the challenge. Needless to say, his efforts where not welcomed by the African Fish Eagle who, with one loud screech, sent the crow flying off in defeat.

If you observe these flying beauties nestled in the heart of Nambiti Hills, you are sure to come across enough to keep you entertained for hours. So pack your bird book and binoculars and visit us for a well-deserved holiday.

See you soon!

World Animal Day

October, 4th being World Animal Day is a cause for celebration across the globe! It is special for all animal lovers and marks an international day to remember the importance of sharing our planet with other species.

Back in 1931, the first World Animal Day was held to highlight the plight of endangered species around the world. October, 4th was originally chosen because it is the feast day of Francis of Assisi, a nature lover and patron saint of animals and the environment. World Animal Day is an opportunity to speak out to ensure the humane treatment of animals everywhere!

In support of this initiative, we have put together a special collection of photos of our majestic animals, taken by our rangers.

Happy World Animal Day,

Cheetah

Cheetah

Black-backed Jackal

Black-backed Jackal

Elephant

Elephant

Giraffe

Giraffe

Hippo

Hippo

Lion & Lioness

Lion & Lioness

Reedbuck

Reedbuck

Serval

Serval

Zebra

Zebra

A Ranger’s Album

Nothing tells a story quite like pictures! Our rangers are our eyes and ears on the ground and captured amazing shots of this month’s wonderful adventures.

Post your photographs on our social circles and let us share your special moments too.

Facebook: facebook.com/nambitihills
Twitter: twitter.com/nambitihills | @Nambiti Hills
Instagram: Instagram.com/NambitiHills
Trip Advisor: tripadvisor.com | Search: Nambiti Hills

Nambiti’s Breeding Herd

Nambiti’s Breeding Herd

A drink fit for a King!

A drink fit for a King!

A Sunbathing Hippo

A Sunbathing Hippo

The roar of a lioness

The roar of a lioness

A Steppe Buzzard

A Steppe Buzzard

Gemsbok

Gemsbok

Zebra Crossing!

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In an environment where most creatures camouflage themselves with their surroundings, our painted horses really stand out with their black and white striped ensemble. It makes them hard to miss and they are probably one of the first signs of wildlife you will notice as you reach Nambiti Hills.

Zebras are social creatures and you will find them in herds aka “harems” that is led by one dominant male. Recently, we spotted a few stallions play-fighting. This helps them sharpen their skills for when fighting over females which often results in fights to the death.

They have excellent eyesight and hearing which enables them to sense danger lurking far away. When singled out and chased, they run in zigzag formations to make it difficult for predators to catch them. Have you ever wondered “why stripes”? Well, there are many theories around that but the most common is that when grouped together, their stripes make it difficult for a predator to pick out one zebra to chase. Safety in numbers could not hold more truth!

Here are a few images of our zebras at Nambiti Hills.

Having a drink of water

Having a drink of water


Stallions play-fighting

Stallions play-fighting


A 'Harem' of zebras

A ‘Harem’ of zebras